For Black History Month we are exhibiting artist, Joe Ziegler, who emphasizes the cultural and historic importance of black contributors, with intent to encourage further research and engage respectful dialogue regarding our culture’s collective history through their art. We will be displaying these works on the walls of our Marina dispensary from Feb 1st to March 28th.

“‘Black Faces of Rock’ was first exhibited in 2015 as 12 iconographic, pointillistic portraits of black musicians who have inspired generations of rock and roll. Each piece commemorates a black artist using tiny individual acrylic dots painstakingly painted on repurposed OSB Plywood boards. The series, now at 20 portraits, invites a focus on these icons deserving recognition.

I view challenging our social habits as an artistic duty, and I believe that the representation of non-white history has been oppressively diminished. Therefore, ‘Black Faces of Rock’ emphasizes the cultural and historic importance of black contributors, with intent to encourage further research and engage respectful dialogue regarding our culture’s collective history.

In the 50s, white artists and predominantly white record labels began co-opting black music (primarily gospel and blues at the time) to suit the white audiences of America. Jerry Lee Lewis, then Elvis Presley, and later, folks like Johnny Cash were all beneficiaries of rock music’s roots in black music. This mimicry of black accomplishment is often celebrated as white achievement. ‘Black Faces of Rock’ is an attempt to help balance the scales.” -- Joe Ziegler

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